Whiteknighting Beatles

Whiteknighting is really annoying and usually a major Bro Code violation. But I guess when you’re in the most famous band in the world, you can get away with some whiteknight behavior. Hell, getting whiteknighted by the Beatles might actually be a DHV (Eric Clapton might have an interesting perspective on this).

She Loves You

She said you hurt her so
She almost lost her mind.
But now she said she knows
You’re not the hurting kind.

[Sounds like the protagonist is kind of a bad-boy type.]

You know it’s up to you,
I think it’s only fair,
Pride can hurt you, too,
Apologize to her

Because she loves you
And you know that can’t be bad.
Yes, she loves you
And you know you should be glad. Ooh!

You’re Gonna Lose That Girl

If you don’t take her out tonight,
She’s gonna change her mind,
And I will take her out tonight,
And I will treat her kind.

You’re gonna lose that girl.
You’re gonna lose that girl.

If you don’t treat her right, my friend,
You’re gonna find her gone,
’cause I will treat her right, and then
You’ll be the lonely one.

I’ll make a point
Of taking her away from you, yeah,
(watch what you do)
The way you treat her what else can I do?

About these ads

6 Comments

Filed under history, original research

6 responses to “Whiteknighting Beatles

  1. Matt

    40 years ago, being a White Knight wasn’t such a bad thing. Women still reacted positively to being treated well. I miss those days. Today, everything I knew is wrong.

  2. I think the lyrics were probably geared towards an audience of females and male betas.

    Alphas would have listened to the Rolling Stones, Led Zep or The Who.

  3. The Truth

    Yeah fuck the beatles. I agree with the above poster. led Zep all the way.

  4. The Truth

    Addendum: as led Zep sang, soul of a woman was created below.

  5. Days of Broken Arrows

    I think you misread the lyrical content of “She Loves You.” It’s not so much a white knighting song as a “Go get her, bro” song. They’re singing to a guy, offering him help — and a way to get some action (in 1963, when this was written, “love” was often a stand-in for sex in lyrics). The Beatles take this same tack in “Hey Jude.”

    A white knight song would be something more along the lines of John Maier’s “Daughters” or any of those schmaltzy “I’d climb a mountain for you” songs that you hear in country music. White knighting means sacrificing your standing or placating a woman, and that’s NOT what the Beatles are doing here.

    In fact, the Beatles were often downright cruel to women in their songs. You may wanna check out the album cuts “You Like Me Too Much,” “You Can’t Do That,” “Getting Better,” “You Won’t See Me” and “Run for Your Life,” among others. Hell, he burns the girl’s house down because she wouldn’t sleep with him at the end of “Norwegian Wood” (John’s song, Paul’s idea).

  6. “40 years ago, being a White Knight wasn’t such a bad thing. Women still reacted positively to being treated well. I miss those days. Today, everything I knew is wrong.

    Ain’t that the truth. This describes male confusion better than most.

    “Alphas would have listened to the Rolling Stones, Led Zep or The Who.”

    I wonder if Pete Townshend was the first 60’s musician to try to use the affectations of mysticism to get laid.

    Days of Broken Arrows,

    You make part of my point – getting “whiteknighted” by the Beatles is a DHV. When a guy who has thousands of girls screaming for him tells you to go get her you do it!

    “Hey Jude” was ostensibly written to John Lennon’s son about his parents’ divorce and Yoko Ono, but as McCartney is a really good songwriter it works as a lover’s song too.

    It is very interesting to play the Beatles’ albums in sequence and notice how the lyrical content went from doo-wop lovey at the start to considerably melancholy in the mid-60’s, as both their personal lives got more complicated and the euphoria/novelty of being the most famous band in the world wore off. I expect John always had a playful teasing disposition towards the girls, whereas Paul probably had more of an aloof/pensive attitude. George opened his songwriting catalog with “Don’t Bother Me,” an ode to oneitis, and continued with a string of beta songs: “I Need You,” “Taxman,” “Something,” “For You Blue.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s